Typing Chinuk Wawa in Emacs

Olympia typewriter - German keyboard layout

Back in 2015, I took a course in being an ally for local Native American communities from the Portland Underground Grad School (PUGS). One action that was suggested during the course was learning the local language, but it proved difficult to find opportunities. When the pandemic forced school closures, though, Lane Community College began offering classes online. I found out about this thanks to the excellent Kaltash Wawa blog, and this fall I signed up to take a remote Chinuk Wawa class through Lane Community College.

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Slides on a Stick with Raspberry Pi Zero W

If you give presentations often, you will know that one of the biggest headaches is managing slides. You have to figure out software, hardware, and connectors. I’ve usually resorted to bringing a USB thumb drive with my slides in PDF and ODP format, but then I came across an even better idea: the Raspberry Pi Zero W (or RPi0W).

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CenturyLink AppFog Tutorial

Recently I wrote a tutorial with Word Lions for CenturyLink Cloud that teaches how to build and deploy a Node.js application to CenturyLink AppFog. The tutorial and application were really fun to build and write. It was my first Node.js project, and my first experience with CloudFoundry. The tutorial uses the following CenturyLink Cloud products:

AppFog is CenturyLink Cloud’s CloudFoundry system. It is really powerful, and it appears to be more flexible than Google App Engine.

Read the Tutorial

The tutorial walks you through building a document storage system with a built-in PDF reader and comment storage. It also includes user authentication and some other neat Node.js tricks. You can follow the tutorial from the following links, which will include all of the information needed to get you up and running on AppFog with Node.js. Enjoy!

  1. Deploy an App With User Login
  2. Using CenturyLink Cloud for Object Storage
  3. Add Search Capabilities with Orchestrate
  4. Building a PDF Viewer and Comment System